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California Meadow Sedge Carex pansa

  • Exposure
    • Part Sun to Sun
  • Season
    • Spring
    • Summer
  • Mature Size
    • 6 - 10 Inches
Programs
Proven Selections
Proven Selections
California Meadow Sedge Carex pansa
Part Sun to Sun 6 - 10

Features

Lustrous green, curling leaves spread to form colonies

Foliage Interest
Deadheading Not Necessary
Grass: 
Grass

Characteristics

Duration: 
Annual
Garden Height: 
6 - 10 Inches
Spacing: 
8 - 12 Inches
Flower Shade: 
None
Foliage Colors: 
Green
Foliage Shade: 
Green
Habit: 
Upright
Container Role: 
Thriller

Plant Needs

Light Requirement: 
Part Sun to Sun
Maintenance Category: 
Easy
Bloom Time: 
Grown for Foliage
Hardy Temperature: 
10°F
Hardiness Zones: 
8a, 8b, 9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b
Water Category: 
Average
Uses: 
Grass
Uses: 
Landscape
Uses: 
Container
Uses Notes: 

Alternative to grass for lawns in warm regions

Maintenance Notes: 

California Meadow Sedge is a cool season grass. Where temperatures get colder than ten degrees F, the plants should be treated as annuals. Once the grass turns brown it can either be removed immediately or removed in the spring. It should not be expected to live through the winter and begin growing again in the spring.

In areas where winter temperatures remain above ten degrees it should be considered a perennial and the following information should be useful. Cool-season grasses put on most of their growth in spring before temperatures begin exceeding 75 degrees Fahrenheit and in the fall when temperatures cool down. They generally maintain good color through the summer but won't grow much when it is hot.
Cut back cool season grasses in very early spring.

Cool season grasses tend to look good even as the weather cools. Leave their foliage in place until spring and then as soon as the snow is gone cut them back. Leave about 1/3 of the plant in place. Trimming cool season grasses too harshly can irreparably harm the plant.

Divide cool season grasses in spring or early fall. Cool season grasses are actively growing in spring and fall. These grasses can be transplanted at either time of the year but early spring is probably the best time to divide. If you do divide them in the fall, be careful that the freeze/thaw cycles of winter don't heave the plants out of the ground, this happened to a couple of my coral bells last winter.

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