Skip to Content Skip to Navigation

All About Lifeberry® Goji berries (Lycium Barbarum)

Goji is a sprawling shrub with long, flexible canes and clusters of small, grey-green leaves. The flowers are a brilliant royal purple and they appear in late spring/early summer along the length of the canes. They give way to juicy, bright red fruits that resemble small peppers. They grow sweeter as they mature on the plant. Goji plants continue to flower and produce fruit through the first heavy frost.

Tags:

Though they sound exotic and are most often found with a high price tag in health food stores, Goji berries are actually easy to grow hardy plants. If they weren’t, well, we wouldn’t have added them to the line of Proven Winners® ColorChoice flowering shrubs. We’ve got two varieties of tasty, beautiful goji berries: Sweet Lifeberry® and Big Lifeberry®. These exceptional strains were specially selected in China, where goji has been grown for centuries for its purported health-giving properties and brilliant fruit color (red symbolizes joy in Chinese culture). Sweet Lifeberry and Big Lifeberry goji have been a hit in Europe and we are pleased to finally offer them to North American gardeners.

Description: Goji is a sprawling shrub with long, flexible canes and clusters of small, grey-green leaves. The flowers are a brilliant royal purple and they appear in late spring/early summer along the length of the canes. They give way to juicy, bright red fruits that resemble small peppers. They grow sweeter as they mature on the plant. Goji plants continue to flower and produce fruit through the first heavy frost.

How to grow

Zone: hardy to USDA zone 5; heat tolerant to AHS zone 9

Exposure: Full sun is best, but tolerates a bit of shade.

Height: 5-7’ (1.5-2.1 m)

Water: The plants tolerate some drought once established, but for best fruit set and quality, water regularly.

Soil: Any well-drained soil will do.

Staking: Goji naturally wants to sprawl and creep along the ground. To save space and to make harvesting the berries easier, you can bundle the strongest 3-5 canes around a 6-8’/1.8-2.4m tall stake (choose something sturdy, like 1”x1” wood).

Pests: Goji berry plants will not be bothered by insects or diseases, but birds, deer, and raccoons may all find the fruit as appealing as you do. If you notice damage to the fruit or plant, or have a problem with these visitors damaging other plants in your garden, use a netting or repellent, particularly once the plant begins flowering and fruiting.

Pruning: Goji does not require pruning to grow well and produce fruit. However, you may find the plant is more manageable and easier to harvest when its lateral (horizontal) branches are lightly pruned to encourage branching and the production of vigorous new growth.

Harvesting: Goji berries begin to ripen in early summer. They should be plucked off by hand when they are brilliant red and taste sweet. They come off the plant easily, without the need for pruners or a knife.

Fertilizing: For an abundant crop, apply a fertilizer formulated for flowering woody plants in early spring, just as new growth begins. Rose fertilizer is an excellent, readily available choice.

FAQ

Can I grow goji berry in a container?

Yes! Goji will do great in a container. Just be sure to choose one large enough – it should be at least 18” in diameter and have a drainage hole. The container should also be weatherproof so that it can remain outside, planted with your goji, all year long. Use any regular potting soil to plant in and be sure to keep a close eye on watering, particularly during the hottest part of the summer.

When are my goji berries ready to harvest?

Goji berries turn red very quickly but will taste slightly bitter until they are fully ripe. Taste is your best indicator, but in general, the berries should spend several weeks on the vine before being harvested. It is best to harvest before the first frost, however, because cold can diminish the flavor of the fruit.

Where can I grow goji berries?

Goji berries will thrive in the majority of the US and Canada. They are hardy to USDA zone 5, with maximum low temperature around -18 degrees F/-27 degrees C; if you live in a colder climate and would like to try goji, you will get berries that summer but the plant may not come back next year. Goji is very tolerant of hot and dry climates –in fact, many of its relatives grow wild in the deserts of Arizona, Texas, and Mexico.

Do I need two gojis for pollination?

No – gojis are self-fruitful. They do not require another plant to bear fruit. 

How do I use my goji berries?

You can use your goji berries in the same way that you use those that you purchase in the store. They can be used fresh if you wish, or they can be frozen or dried. To dry gojis, harvest them and simply spread the fresh berries in a single layer on a sheet of newspaper. Keep in a cool, dry spot, out of bright light, until the berries are dry. They keep their color well and can be used as is or rehydrated with liquid, as your recipe and preferences dictate. To freeze, place in a freezer bag and lay flat until frozen. This keeps them from sticking together in large clumps. Well-sealed frozen goji berries should keep for several months and can be used straight from the freezer in your recipe.

Here are two of our favorite recipes for using your goji harvest:

Uncle Buck’s Goji Salsa

  • 8 c. Big Lifeberry gojis
  • 8 c. tomatoes, peeled and diced
  • 4 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 T. black pepper
  • ¼ c. salt
  • ¾ c. sugar
  • 1 c. white vinegar
  • 3 onions, chopped
  • 4 green peppers, chopped
  • 15 jalapeño pepper, minced
  • 12 oz. can tomato paste

Bring all ingredients (except tomato paste) to boil. Simmer 45 minutes. After 30 minutes, stir in tomato paste.  Yields 8 quarts.

Sweet Lifeberry® Breakfast Bars

  • ¾ c. brown sugar firmly packed
  • ¾ c. granulated sugar
  • 8 oz. low-fat vanilla yogurt
  • 2  egg whites, lightly beaten
  • 2 T. vegetable oil
  • 2 T. nonfat milk
  • 2 t. vanilla
  • 1½ c. all-purpose flour
  • 1 t. baking soda
  • 1 t. ground cinnamon
  • ½ t. salt (optional)
  • 3 c. old fashioned oats
  • 1 c. dried Sweet Lifeberry goji berries

Preheat oven to 350°F. In large bowl combine sugars, yogurt, egg whites, oil, milk and vanilla; mix well. In medium bowl combine flour, baking soda, cinnamon and salt; mix well. Add dry ingredients to wet mix; mix well. Stir in oats and goji berries. Spread dough onto bottom of ungreased 13 x 9 baking pan. Bake 28-32 minutes or until golden brown. Cool completely on wire rack. Cut into bars. Store tightly covered.

Do I need to do anything to my gojis for winter?

If you live in zone 5 or warmer, you’ve got nothing to worry about! A 2-3” thick layer of shredded bark mulch over the entire root zone of the plant is a welcome blanket to insulate against fluctuating temperatures and conserve moisture. Other than that, however, goji require no special treatment for the winter.

Do I need to prune my goji berries every year?

Your goji will grow and thrive, even if you never prune it once. However, it will be easier to harvest with some selective pruning. Simply shorten the horizontal branches by about half to two-thirds in early spring, just as the buds begin to break. Plants can withstand severe pruning, but fruiting may be minimal in the following season.

Got more goji questions? We’re here to help! Contact us anytime.

235 Readers Rated This: 12345 (3.2)
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Sun, 07/19/2015 - 7:34pm

Hi,

I am seeing a lot of purple flowers on my goji berry plant for a while now, but I have not detect any fruit. How long does it take from flower to a ripe fruit?

Thank you.

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Tue, 07/21/2015 - 7:15am

After the flower drops off, you should see a sort of lumpy looking green berry. In about 4-6 weeks after, it will begin to turn red and become soft as it nears ripeness. Exactly how long this takes depends on weather and growing conditions, but 4-6 weeks is a pretty good estimate. If no berries are forming, the issue must be a lack of pollination.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Thu, 07/16/2015 - 12:52pm

I live in SE Saskatchewan, gets very cold here in winter months.
My goji berries wintered well with burlap bag wrapped around.
Temperatures dip to -40 F. Even so, I will give them better
protection next winter.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Wed, 07/08/2015 - 8:54am

This is my gogi plant's second season in Calgary Alberta, zone 3. In the The first season there was a fair amount of berries. In May this year there were lots of flowers. It is now July and all those flowering has not turned out berries. Instead I see dry and black stuff where the berries are supposed to be. Some of the leaves look chewed on and some branches are bare for a space of 6 to 8 inches in between leaves.

Please advise

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Wed, 07/08/2015 - 10:13am

It sounds like your flowers are not getting pollinated for some reason, but the only way to tell for sure what's going on with your plant is to see a photo of it. Would you please use our contact form (https://www.provenwinners.com/feedback) to send us a message, selecting "Shrubs" as the category? I will reply with an email address where you can send photos.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Tue, 07/07/2015 - 11:31am

I purchased my plant at Wojos in Michigan. The leaves are now similar to my rose bush (dark red/purple). The leaves are not brittle and it has not flowered. Is my plant dying?

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Wed, 07/08/2015 - 10:11am

I don't think it is dying, but it sounds like it is undergoing some kind of stress: too much water, too little, perhaps? Gojis also turn purple if they are exposed to cold, so if you had sudden unseasonably cold temperatures, that could be it. Please use our contact form (https://www.provenwinners.com/feedback) to send us a message, selecting "Shrubs" as the category, and we will respond with an e-mail address where you can send us photos, as seeing the plant is the only way to provide an accurate diagnosis.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Thu, 07/02/2015 - 5:33pm

I live in Canada zone 5 and i purchased a goji plant but the whole plant is yellow and some leaves are turning grey and falling off... i purchased it this way and im hoping i can bring it back it is still in its original pot should i transplant it with some fresh soil?
i leave it outside in full sun all day and water it once a day ... ive heard that yellowing leaves can mean not enough nitrogen or overwatering.
i really love goji and i want this plant to make it
thanks
Ash

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Tue, 07/07/2015 - 7:08am

I would recommend that you plant your goji in the ground sooner than later. Do not add any type of new soil to the hole when you plant it; you can view our planting instructions here: https://www.provenwinners.com/learn/planting/how-plant-shrub. When you plant it, you should be able to tell pretty quickly if the plant is suffering from overwatering - the soil may be very wet and you'll see soft, rotten roots. That said, gojis are very heavy feeders, so I would recommend that after planting, you apply a balanced liquid fertilizer right away. You can make another application later this month if you wish, but do not fertilize it after late July/early August or there may be issues with its ability to enter dormancy as the days get shorter.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Wed, 06/24/2015 - 2:29pm

I planted two goji berry plants this spring and following the advice of the nurseryman who sold it to me, planted it with the same soil amendment I used for the blue berries and blackberries. They are doing fine, but the goji bushes are not putting out new growth and the leaves are beginning to yellow. I live in USDA zone 9 and so planted them where they get morning shade in the summer time. I give them water three or four times a week, depending on how hot and dry it's been.

Now I'm beginning to wonder if I made the soil too acidic for them by using the potting mix intended for the blueberries. Is this what could be wrong with them? Our weather has hit the 80's and is staying there or higher, so I know they should be doing something, right?

Thank you!

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Fri, 06/26/2015 - 6:58am

That may be - goji berries are not particularly finicky about soil, but a very acid soil (say, below about 5.8 or so) could be too acid for them. You might be able to keep growing them there if you apply a fertilizer that helps make up for the definiciency of certain nutrients that become "tied up" in an acid soil - I would recommend a granular organic fertilizer like Espoma Garden Tone.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Wed, 06/17/2015 - 11:27pm

I'm trying to grow the plant in a pot. Does the goji plant have a preferred pH for the best growth? Thanks

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Fri, 06/19/2015 - 10:38am

No, goji is very adaptable about pH. Any fresh new potting soil that you use will foster good growth.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Sat, 06/13/2015 - 6:11pm

I bought 2 1-gallon proven winners big lifeberry plants from HD online and the leaves are turning purple with some white specks. I also bought the sweet lifeberry plants but they haven't turned purple yet. Could you please help me trouble shoot? Thank you. Dee

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Fri, 06/19/2015 - 10:40am

Hi Dee - where are you located? Goji berry foliage tends to turn purple if it was exposed to cool conditions (for example, if the plant was grown in a warmer climate and then shipped to a cooler one to be sold). I have also seen purple color on very drought stressed plants. It's not typically a major cause for concern, but we would need to see photos to be sure. Please send us a message (https://www.provenwinners.com/feedback) and we will give you an email address to send photos to.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Sat, 05/30/2015 - 2:34pm

I live 30 miles North of Houston, Texas. In March I purchased two Goji berry plants from the Harris County Master Gardener Spring plant sale. I have the plants in a 4 ft. X 10 ft. raised planter w/soil augmented w/organic matter. This planter and two others are in a completely screened in enclosure (We built a PVC frame and have rabbit wiring around bottom and bird netting around upper 1/3 of walls and "roof"........We have many deer, coons, rabbits, and cardinals and blue birds). These plants were fertilized in April w/ fruiting plant fertilizer spikes. These plants were full and lush after fertilizing. In late April we suffered a tornado but the plants seemed to be fine. We have had a very wet spring with record setting rainfall. Now most of the leaves are gone but there is evidence of many leaves beginning to bud. We have had mostly overcast sky w/ occasional sunshine.
What was the probable cause of losing leaves? Wind? Rain? Lack of sunlight?

I have been a very successful ornamental gardener for 30 years of City living. Now in the country, I seem to be suffering many new challenges in my quest to live off the land!

MeMe O.

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Tue, 06/02/2015 - 1:55pm

I'm not sure what could have caused the leaves to drop suddenly - it's hard to say without seeing the plant and surroundings. Did they drop when they were green, or did they turn yellow or purple and then fall off? As long as it is growing new leaves, you have nothing to worry about - goji berries are extremely vigorous plants and can withstand a lot of stress, so it could be something with the tornado, or even something like over fertilizing or pesticide drift if you live in an agricultural area. If you'd like to send us a photo of the plant, please use our contact form and select "shrubs" as the category and I'll reply with my email address: https://www.provenwinners.com/feedback

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Tue, 05/19/2015 - 3:46pm

Hi,
We bought your goji berry plants from Jung's garden center in Wisconsin. After we transferred the bare root to the ground, the leaves started to look very droopy. They have not recovered in these two days. I watered them after planting and cannot think of doing anything wrong. And they are in a very sunny location. I worry they are going to die. Is there anything I can do?

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Tue, 06/02/2015 - 2:01pm

Have your plants recovered yet? When you planted them, did you add anything to the soil, or just plant them right into the ground? Did you purchase the plant bare-root or did you remove the soil? If your plants have not yet recovered, please use our contact form and select "shrubs" as the category so we can help you get to the bottom of it.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Tue, 05/19/2015 - 9:24am

I pruned my goji and hated to just throw the cuttings away so I just stuck them in pots of potting soil w/o any rooting hormone or anything and now instead of 1 plant I have 4 .All the cuttings rooted to my surprise. Is this common.
?

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Tue, 06/02/2015 - 2:02pm

Many woody plants can root easily from cuttings, but it really depends on the plant species and the time of year.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Fri, 04/17/2015 - 9:32pm

Hello
I'm growing a goji plant from seed.
It's around a foot in height but it's stalk is very week.
I have it propped up with a stick.
I was looking for advice on if I should get something for it to grow up on. Or get something to strengthen it's stalk
Thanks

Kelly Geoghegan's picture
Kelly Geoghegan Fri, 04/24/2015 - 1:05pm

Goji naturally wants to sprawl and creep along the ground. To save space and to make harvesting the berries easier, you can bundle the strongest 3-5 canes around a 6-8’/1.8-2.4m tall stake (choose something sturdy, like 1”x1” wood).

Proven Winners

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Wed, 04/15/2015 - 7:59am

Hi, I just got the Big Lifeberry®. yesterday, and very excited about it. I plan to put her into a big wooden pot. I hope she likes it. I will keep you update:)

Cindy Meyers's picture
Cindy Meyers Wed, 04/15/2015 - 12:45pm

We are so glad to hear of your excitement!
Happy gardening!
Cindy

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Mon, 03/02/2015 - 4:57am

Dear Sirs,
Am I correct if the two cultivars of Lycium barbarum sold under the trademarks Sweet Lifeberry and Big Lifeberry also have cultivar names. And will I be wrong if these are 'Ningqibahao' and 'Ningqijiuhao', i.e. the two denominations for which Ningxias Simon seed industry biological engineering co., LTD has applied for and recieved PBR in 2012? As you actually can't, find these cultivar names in connectioin with the two trademarks, most likely the trademarks become generic and could easily be challenged.
Kind regards
Björn Aldén, nomenclature expert

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Tue, 03/03/2015 - 8:55am

Hi Bjorn - many thanks for your comment. We apologize that the cultivar information was not included in the records for our Sweet Lifeberry and Big Lifeberry goji. I have updated those records to include this data now: Sweet Lifeberry® is Lycium barbarum 'SMNDSL' and Big Lifeberry® is 'SMNDBL.' These two varieties were actually developed in Germany, not China, and we have applied for plant breeder's rights on Sweet Lifeberry, which we expect to have granted sometime this year. If you have further questions or concerns about the nomenclature of these or other varieties, please use the "Contact Us" link at the bottom of the page to reach us directly.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Tue, 01/06/2015 - 9:33pm

Hi Friends!

I live in central Oklahoma. When is the best time to plant a goji berry? Thanks!

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Wed, 01/07/2015 - 11:09am

Hi there! The best time to plant a goji berry in your climate (or really, any climate), is after danger of frost has passed and the soil is workable: that is, not too wet or soggy. The exact timing will vary based on your climate and the weather, but I'm guessing for central Oklahoma, that would probably be early April or so.

dharris214's picture
dharris214 Mon, 10/20/2014 - 1:22pm

My PW Goji has flowered like crazy all summer but it has not one single berry. I purchased it from Southern States in April & it is fairly large now. It is in a 22" pot and receives lots of sunlight. Any ideas on how to get it to set fruit?

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Wed, 04/15/2015 - 9:02am

Fertilizers can affect your Goji one type is meant to stimulate root growth, stem vigor, and flower and fruit production. Fertilizers of this sort contain little nitrogen and higher levels of phosphorus and potassium; the N-P-K ratio may be 3-20-20, for example if you want fruit.

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Wed, 01/07/2015 - 11:10am

Sorry we didn't see your message until just now - It's definitely strange that your plant would flower prolifically but not get fruit. I realize it is probably dormant now, but please contact us via the form at provenwinners.com/feedback if you have the same problem next season and we'll help you get to the bottom of it.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Mon, 10/13/2014 - 2:03pm

I was wondering if if this is the lycium barbarum L variety ?
Thank you
Josephine
CAPTCHA

Cindy Meyers's picture
Cindy Meyers Mon, 10/13/2014 - 4:01pm

Both our Big Lifeberry Goji and our Sweet Lifeberry Goji are Lycium barbarum varieties.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Fri, 10/03/2014 - 3:33am

I planted a goji plant last year and it survived a cold winter that left killed my sweet cherry and two branches of my peach tree; I had a good number from goji that I bought that was three years old. I have utilized both leaves and berries using them in my smoothie every day; it is great alone or with other berries and fruilt. if you live in northern zone it is best to buy a goji plant from two or more years old; success also includes mulching it well for cold weather or too dry weather; good luck in getting this wonderful plant to grow. I live in Miles City, Montana

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Thu, 10/02/2014 - 4:20pm

I would like to know how much pounds or kilos can i harvest from a goji berry tree?

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Wed, 04/15/2015 - 8:55am

Once full grown around 2 pounds, the more you pick, the more they grow. But only pick them when they are ripe, sweet, and come off easy.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Thu, 08/21/2014 - 8:31am

my plant is three years old and i have not produced even 1 berry. It is planted in my backyard and receives sunlight most of the day. The soil however is mostly clay. should i remove it and put in a container? chris R

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Thu, 08/28/2014 - 1:38pm

Sorry to hear about your goji berry plant. These plants need full sun - at least 8 hours of bright light each day - to grow and flower their best. If it is not getting this much sun, that would be the first thing you should do. You can plant it into a container if that is the best way of getting your plant more light. Next, have you been pruning it at all? If so, when? If pruned later in the spring, the plant may have difficulty creating flower buds. Finally, is your plant staked? Keeping the canes upright seems to help encourage flowering and subsequently, fruiting.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Wed, 08/20/2014 - 11:17am

What is the difference between big life and sweet life? Is one sweeter while the other has bigger but less sweet berries?

Marissa DeVlieger's picture
Marissa DeVlieger Wed, 08/20/2014 - 11:36am

Thank you for contacting us! Yes, the Big Lifeberry has slightly larger berries, while the Sweet Lifeberry has smaller, sweeter berries. I hope this helps! Marissa DeVlieger PW

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Sun, 08/03/2014 - 12:14am

After having a third of the leaves disappear from my goji plant, I took a closer look and discovered three hornworms hiding in the lower parts. I have tomatoes and sweet peppers growing in my garden but the hornworms haven't bothered them, just the goji plant.

Stacey Hirvela's picture
Stacey Hirvela Thu, 08/28/2014 - 1:31pm

Goji berries are closely related to tomatoes and peppers, so it isn't surprising that the tomato hornworms would try them. I recommend handpicking the caterpillars. If you are squeamish, you can simply toss them on to your driveway or the sidewalk and the birds will hopefully find it and enjoy a tasty meal!

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Tue, 06/10/2014 - 10:48am

I have a goji berry bush that I ordered in March or April. It took off growing and had lots of new leaves come in, but now the leaves are falling off of it. Is this normal?

Marissa DeVlieger's picture
Marissa DeVlieger Wed, 08/20/2014 - 11:44am

No, it is not normal for your goji berry to be losing leaves during the growing season. This indicates that is either getting too much or too little water, and/or that it is in too much shade.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Mon, 06/02/2014 - 9:23pm

I am getting different information on how far apart to plant them. Also I see you can container grow them. Had a couple small plants and planted in a 6 to 8 inch pot, havent really grown in a month or more. Any suggestions?

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Mon, 06/02/2014 - 9:21pm

Bought your goji berries through Stark bros. though it stated differenly from that 2 were needed.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Thu, 04/10/2014 - 4:06pm

Thanks for this Information. I also apprecitate the recipes as well.

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Thu, 04/03/2014 - 4:13pm

This was just what I needed . Care, description and all the info I could think to ask.
Thanks

Anonymous's picture
Anonymous Thu, 04/03/2014 - 8:25am

I'm just curious, do Sweet Lifeberry® and Big Lifeberry® have original cultivar names?

Showing 1 - 50 of 57.
Back to Top