Skip to Content Skip to Navigation

Superbells® Yellow Chiffon
Calibrachoa hybrid

  • Exposure
    • Sun
  • Season
    • Spring
    • Summer
    • Fall
  • Mature Size
    • 6 - 10 Inches
Programs
Top Seller
Award Winner
Proven Winners
Proven Winners
Superbells® Yellow Chiffon Calibrachoa hybrid
Sun 6 - 10

Features

I paint in WATER COLORS.

Abundant, small petunia-like flowers all season on cascading growth; low maintenance.

Best Seller
Award Winner
Continuous Bloom or Rebloomer
Long Blooming
Fall Interest
Heat Tolerant
Deadheading Not Necessary
Attracts: 
Birds
Hummingbirds

Characteristics

Duration: 
Annual
Height Category: 
Medium
Garden Height: 
6 - 10 Inches
Trails Up To: 
24 Inches
Spacing: 
8 - 10 Inches
Spread: 
12 - 24 Inches
Flower Colors: 
Yellow
Flower Shade: 
Blush Yellow
Foliage Colors: 
Green
Foliage Shade: 
Green
Habit: 
Mounding Trailing
Container Role: 
Spiller

Plant Needs

Light Requirement: 
Sun
Maintenance Category: 
Easy
Bloom Time: 
Planting To Hard Frost
Hardiness Zones: 
9a, 9b, 10a, 10b, 11a, 11b
Water Category: 
Average
Needs Good Drainage
Uses: 
Container
Uses Notes: 

Calibrachoa do not like to have constantly damp soil. They will do well in the ground only with good drainage. For most gardeners containers are the best use for Calibrachoa.

Maintenance Notes: 

When planting Calibrachoa I often give the plants a slight trim, using a sharp pair of scissors or pruning shears. While not a necessary step, it will increase branching and may help your plants look even fuller.

Calibrachoa are usually easiest to grow in containers because if the roots are kept too wet can lead to root rot diseases. In containers, allow the top of the soil to dry before watering again. If your plant is wilting even though the soil is still damp you likely have a root rot problem. Calibrachoa can be fantastic in-ground plants, but only if they are planted in well drained soil. Raised beds would be a good choice for planting Calibrachoa in the landscape. In the ground they shouldn't need much additional water unless conditions are very dry. Proper watering is key to growing good Calibrachoa.

The plants are low-maintenance with no deadheading needed. They will do best if fertilized in a regular basis. Calibrachoa can be sensitive to both high and low pH. If your plants have been growing for a while and then begin to look a bit tired and not so good there are several things to try. If the foliage is yellow there are two possible causes. If you haven't been fertilizing regularly they could simply be hungry and in need of fertilizer. Feed them using a well-balanced (look for something with an n-p-k ration near 20-10-20) water soluble fertilizer. If you have been fertilizing regularly with a well-balanced fertilizer and the foliage is still turning yellow it is probably because the pH range in your soil has gotten a bit high or low. The most common impact of this is that Iron can no longer be taken up by the plant, even if it is available in the soil. The common form of Iron used in fertilizer is sensitive to pH changes. If you think pH is your problem you can either try to lower (or raise) the pH or you can simply apply Chelated Iron, which is available at a wider pH range and should help your plants turn green again. You may also be able to find Iron in a foliar spray (which means you spray it on the foliage rather than applying it to the soil) which can also help your plant turn nice and green again. Stop by your favorite garden center and they should be able to help you choose a product to use.

As the season goes on the plants can sometimes just start to look open and not as good. This can happen even if they are being watered and fertilized correctly. Fortunately this is very simple to fix. Grab a sharp pair of scissors or pruning shears and give the plants an all over trim. This will cause them to branch out more and should stimulate new growth and flowering, especially if you fertilize right after trimming them back. Just like your hair looks a lot better after a trim, your plants often will too. You will sacrifice flowers for a few days, but the plants should come back flowering more than ever shortly. I will usually give my Superbells a trim back in late July or early August. Should your plants have a few unruly stems that are longer than everything else or sticking our oddly, you can trim these stems back at anytime. Calibrachoa are very forgiving when it comes to trimming.

An application of fertilizer or compost on garden beds and regular fertilization of plants in pots will help ensure the best possible performance.

Woo-hoo! There is nothing more super than Superbells. If there was a word that meant extra, extra super it still wouldn't be as super as we are. Calibrachoas are a new type of plants that sort of look like little Petunias, which makes sense seeing as we're related. Only Superbells aren't sticky, perk right back up after it rains, and stay compact and bushy even when we are stressed.

Woo-hoo! There is nothing more super than Superbells. If there was a word that meant extra, extra super it still wouldn't be as super as we are. Calibrachoas are a new type of plants that sort of look like little Petunias, which makes sense seeing as we're related. Only Superbells aren't sticky, perk right back up after it rains, and stay compact and bushy even when we're stressed. Superbells are Proven Winners' newest Calibrachoas. We're the ones covered with hundreds of flowers from early spring all the way through those first light frosts. Just 6 - 10 inches tall, our long, long, trailing branches cascade over the sides of hanging baskets and other containers, and spread over flower beds. Hummingbirds are cuckoo about us.

Vigor, heat tolerance and resistance to disease are traits we all share. So is being an annual except in zones 9 - 11. You don't have to deadhead old flowers or pinch back stems. Water only when the top of the soil feels dry. Too much water makes our roots rot (Ick). Full sun. Fertilize once a month. How extra double super easy is that?

Of course I'm a natural blond. Sure, I admit Proven Winners' plant breeders have enhanced my color, but it was a natural process. You know, selective breeding, Mendel's laws - all that genetic stuff. It's a good thing they did, too. We all know what happens to a bad color job in full sun. Fading, uneven tones, and the type of streaking nobody wants. Me, I just love my color. It's a light, buttery yellow (unsalted) and my flowers are veined with pale, bright green and have darker green centers. The only dark roots you'll ever see on me are underground.

Superbells® Yellow Chiffon Calibrachoa hybrid 'USCALI4021' PP: 19480 Can. PP: 3631
More in this series
Award Year Award Plant Trial
2012 Top Performer Ohio State University Extension - Springfield
2012 Leader of the Pack for Containers Ohio State University - Columbus
2012 Top Performer University of Georgia
2012 Top Performer in Containers Kansas State University
2012 Top Performer University of Tennessee
2012 Excellent Performer University Laval
2012 Top Performer Massachusetts Horticultural Society at Elm Bank
2012 Top Performer Oklahoma State University Botanical Gardens
2012 Top Performer Mississippi State University
2011 Top Performer - Containers Kansas State University
  • Rose Champagne
    Combination
    Rose Champagne
    Color SchemeVibrant Mix
    ExposureSun
    Pot Size12 Inches
    Come Back SOON For Details!
    Our gurus are putting the finishing touches on this combination. Details will be available in 10 weeks.
  • Showtime
    Combination
    Showtime
    Color Scheme Complementary
    ExposureSun
    Pot Size12 Inches
    Come Back SOON For Details!
    Our gurus are putting the finishing touches on this combination. Details will be available in 10 weeks.
  • Optimistic
    Combination
    Optimistic
    Color SchemePastel Mix
    ExposureSun
    Pot Size12 Inches
    Come Back SOON For Details!
    Our gurus are putting the finishing touches on this combination. Details will be available in 10 weeks.
More Combinations
Back to Top